Legislative Update May 13th

Dan Reitz | Lobbyist

Illinois lawmakers will return to Springfield next week, May 20th through the 22nd to resume a spring session interrupted by the coronavirus pandemic.

The House will relocate to the Bank of Springfield Center.  All House Democrats are being asked to sign a pledge to follow IDPH precautions when they return. They include getting tested before the session resumes, getting a temperature check on session days, wearing a mask at all times and traveling alone. He asked that all House Republicans also sign the pledge.

The Speaker’s office issued a memo to members advising them of how session will be conducted in a location remote from the Capitol. The Illinois State Police will provide security at the building and only a limited number of the public will be admitted.

Committee hearings will be conducted on the floor. The House clerk will conduct roll call votes when they are required.

The Senate will meet in the Capitol.  The Senate is expected to operate under normal rules.

On Tuesday, Gov. JB Pritzker said he wanted lawmakers to return to Springfield to act on economic relief measures for the coronavirus pandemic.

“The legislature must convene so that we can begin to put our financial and economic house back in order even as we battle this terrible virus,” he said during his daily briefing. “The General Assembly needs to pass a comprehensive plan to support families, small businesses and small towns.”

He said he wanted increased rent and mortgage assistance for families, grants and loans for small businesses and tax credits for small business job recovery. He also wanted assistance for small cities and towns to help with their first responder costs.

Lawmakers have been involved in working groups for weeks trying to negotiate legislation that absolutely must be passed during the spring session. Foremost among them is approval of a state budget. However, it will be a budget that could lose more than $4 billion of revenue that was anticipated before the pandemic hit, forcing businesses to close and putting people out of work. At the same time, there will be pressure to increase spending on programs to help those who have been hurt by the virus and its effects.

Beyond the budget, lawmakers are pushing to get other bills heard.  It is unclear if the General Assembly will hear any legislation that is not directly related to the pandemic during an abbreviated session.

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